Heavy vs. Healthy

So, I recently found Melissa Toler’s blog, and I was totally on fire, while reading her posts. I can agree with so much of what she shares!

However, she got me to thinking about what I believe, and where I stand, as someone who is working on becoming a “Health & Wellness Coach“.

Heavy vs. Healthy | My problem with HAES & Body Positivity | Life, Unleashed

In one of her posts, Melissa stated, “It’s okay to be fat!” What I think she meant to say, however, was “it’s okay to have a bigger body than what society considers ‘ideal'”. Otherwise, I’d have to disagree with her statement. Here’s why…

If someone has a good amount of “fat” on their body, generally they have some unhealthy habits … and those habits can lead to other health issues (heart disease, Diabetes, etc.). Therefore, it would be wise for those people to learn how to take better care of themselves.

And yet, I also believe that, if you are taking care of yourself by eating well and moving regularly, then yes, it is totally fine to have a body that is bigger than what society would tell you is “ideal” (who says society gets to make the rules, anyway? Am I right?! )

My belief is also that you need to find what works for you, in regards to eating, exercise, and just maintaining your health. It doesn’t have to be complicated — heck, it shouldn’t be complicated!

It’s about taking care of yourself so that you feel good, and can enjoy your life … but not to the extent that this completely overtakes your life, and is all you ever think about. It shouldn’t be causing you to completely obsess.

There are FAR MORE IMPORTANT things in life than weight loss, or how we look.

This also got me to researching more about the “health at every size” (HAES) movement. And, while I agree with a few of its tenets, there are more that I disagree with. Just the title, alone, is all wrong… but, I think they mean well.

What I believe is meant by this title — and maybe by the whole movement — is that women can be beautiful at every size. And, that –to me– is far more accurate. No one can judge someone else based on their size alone (though, sadly, many try). Thin doesn’t necessarily equal “healthy”, just as heavy doesn’t necessarily equal “unhealthy”. Our appearance doesn’t equal our state of health.

My feelings are similar, in regards to the whole “body positivity” movement, as well.

It’s totally a good thing to love yourself, no matter your weight or size!  But (and maybe I’m misunderstanding it, here), to completely ignore the need to eat healthy & move regularly while saying, “I love myself, just how I am!” — that’s not right. You are not loving yourself if you aren’t doing what has been proven to help one maintain good health. You are not truly loving yourself by allowing your body to go to waste in order to prove a point to the powers that be (or, just to those in your circles who may have offended you at some point).

There is no one-size-fits-all method … we all have to find what works for us, personally … and then let go of the “shoulds”. We need to stop apologizing for who we are, and for what we feel is right for us.

Again, my point is solely that you can maintain good health habits without having to become all obsessive about them. I believe that it truly is important to pay attention to our health, and to practice those things that will enable us to live life to the fullest. God calls us to be good stewards of what we’re given — including the bodies we live in, given to us so that we can do His work, here on earth.

After all, we can’t fulfill our purpose (our calling) if we can’t even get our butts off the couch! ;)

 

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