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Losing My (Fake) Identity

Losing My (Fake) Identity

From about 2002 to 2012, I was immersed in the book blogging world. It started with a Yahoo! group I’d joined, called “Book-a-Week”. Its participants aimed to read 52 books per year (a “book-a-week”). One of the Book-a-Week group’s rules was that you had to keep a record of the books you’d read. So, I’d started keeping a book journal then, but only a paper version. In 2005, I decided to start keeping an online –blog– version, as well.

Losing My (Fake) ID | Life, Unleashed

For the majority of my book blogging years, I was a stay-at-home-mom (SAHM). As such, I had plenty of time to read and blogging became my place to connect with other adults.

As for the book-a-week goal, I managed to hit it almost every year. And then I started to exceed it. I talked books, read books, researched books, collected books. My collection grew from approximately 300 books to over 1400 books!

Because I’d started several book memes that my readers came, weekly, to play along in (on my blog), I was becoming known in the book blogosphere. I’d taken on the alias of “Mizbooks”, which my readers shortened to “MizB” — something I was fine with. Friends and family even came to know me as “Mizbooks”, and called me “the crazy book lately”.

And so, that’s who I was — who I became. My identity was caught up in my love of books and reading.

Then came the 5 years of being back out in the working world. When I landed a busy, full-time job, my time (and mental capacity) for reading greatly diminished. All-of-a-sudden, I found myself in a sort of identity crisis. If I couldn’t read, then who was I? I’d been the “avid reader”, “MizB”, for so long… now I felt lost.

And I felt ashamed …like I was betraying my blog readers by no longer being this woman who read 80 books per year.

Fast-forward five more years. My reading has dwindled to about 12-15 books read per year. My book blog is barely hanging on, with just two memes left, and about 1/3 of the readership.

I no longer feel as bad for my lack of reading time; but I do still wish I could (would?) read more. Really, it’s now more an issue of time-management and priorities.

warrior woman | Life, UnleashedThe book blog… well, I’d been questioning that aspect, and I’ve decided that I’m not going to keep going with it after the new year (2017). I plan to either hand my two memes over to other bloggers or just let them go, entirely. Part of me doesn’t want to do either, as they feel like my “babies”. But another part of me knows it will be a relief to let them go.

Regardless, this whole “crisis” has taught me something. And that’s that we shouldn’t place our identity in what we do, or in the roles we play. Our truest identity (if we’ve accepted Jesus as Savior) is as daughters (and sons) of the King of Kings, and all that that entails. It’s the only thing that will not change. We’ve been adopted into God’s family, so we’re now set apart and He calls us His own.

I’m still learning to accept myself as who God says I am. But already, it has been both peace-giving and empowering.

So, who do you say that you are? Do you know yourself as a child of God? What do you need in order to make that mental shift?

 

The Hole In Our Faith

The Hole In Our Faith

I believe there is a serious hole in our Christian faith, today. Too many people become a “Christian” in order to avoid hell, or because someone convinced them that they needed to commit their life to Christ. However, these same people are then left without any idea of what they just got themselves into. What did you really just sign on for?

the hole in our faith | Life, Unleashed

 

Sure, these people can go to church (or a church group). They can learn the “lingo” and rituals. They can hear the Bible stories. And they can “mimic” what they see the more “seasoned” Christians doing. For many, this is what happens, and what they settle for.

But here’s the real question:

DOES ANY OF THIS CHANGE YOU?

Because it should. Your life, when compared to that of someone who isn’t a Christian should look radically different. Life with Jesus should spark an authentic, genuine change of heart and behavior. Jesus was –and IS– compelling! Christianity isn’t a set of rules, and it’s not supposed to be boring. Jesus died to set us FREE — to enable us to live life to the fullest! (John 10:10)

Over the next little while, I hope to show you the transformation that I, myself, have gone through — how God showed me more of who He is, and what He’s taught me, thus far. I want to inspire you to live out what you believe, to seek God more & more in your everyday, and to show you that life with Jesus really is far from boring!

“My heart has heard You say, “Come & talk with Me.” And my heart responds, “Lord, I am coming!” (Psalm 27:8)

BOOK REVIEW: “The Renaissance Soul” by Margaret Lobenstine

BOOK REVIEW: “The Renaissance Soul” by Margaret Lobenstine

This was a re-read for me, but it’s one of my favorite books. And, since I was in a slump — and, since this book was calling to me, loudly, from my bookshelf — I had to give it another go. And, sure enough, it did the trick.

I first read this book back in late 2010, and it really got me excited. I shared it with my sister, and she, too, got really excited about the book — after purchasing a copy and reading it.


Margaret writes about people who fit the following profile:

  • prefer variety over repetition
  • illogical and seemingly chaotic
  • don’t like to stick to schedules & to-do lists
  • impulsive
  • flexible
  • prefer many options, rather than one clear choice (hate having to choose just one)
  • easily bored after having mastered something
  • most alive and engaged when learning something new
  • unpredictable
  • respond eagerly to new possibilities
  • constantly chasing new hobbies and interests
  • naturally curious
  • thrives on wearing many ‘hats’
  • enjoys learning new languages & exploring new cultures
  • at peak performance, can be very detail-oriented & focused
  • creative
  • somewhat indulgent
  • passionate and inspired
  • chafe at limits
  • need constant new motivation
  • opt for change over continuation in the face of success
  • don’t like rigid long-term goals, or action plans
  • love to learn
  • interact and evolve with their surroundings

This is very much me. I have always thought I just lacked the perseverance to stick with things, or that I was lazy, or that I was too fickle. Family constantly tell me that I shouldn’t be so “picky”. But, apparently, this is all just a part of my nature! Not to be lazy, fickle, or lack perseverance — but to want to move on as soon as I’ve mastered something, or as soon as my interests change.

This also explains why I frequently change the layout and theme of my blog. 😉

And, I realized that it also explains my crazy desire to pack up and move house every 5 years or so! LOL. Mind you, we’ve been at this house for 10 years now, because we haven’t been able to afford to move. But, I’ve been itching to go for about 5 years now.

For a great review that gives a bit more detail about this book, click {here} to visit The Clear Minded Creative’s blog.

Also, find out if you, too, are a Renaissance Soul, by taking the quiz at the author’s blog!